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How Many Questions Will be On the Part 107 Recurrent Test?

How Many Questions Will be On the Part 107 Recurrent Test?

The FAA has released information on the recurrent test Part 107 pilots will have to take. I was just asked if there will be 40 or 60 questions on the test. Interestingly the FAA does not say.

What we do know is the allotted time for the recurrent test is 1.5 hours instead of the two hours for the initial 60 question Part 107 exam.

I’m not sure it is safe to make any inference that means any number of questions. The recurrent test also leaves out sections on weather and loading and performance.

Here is what we do know for certain from FAA documentation.

“The recurrent knowledge test is an important part of ensuring that airmen who hold a remote pilot certificate with sUAS rating can operate safety in the National Airspace System (NAS). Recurrent testing is required for Airmen who do not hold a pilot certificate that was issued under 14 CFR part 61. The recurrent test is also required for airmen who do hold a pilot certificate that was issued under 14 CFR part 61, but do not have a current Flight Review as per 14 CFR part 61, section, 61.56.

The recurrent knowledge test consists of objective, multiple-choice questions. There is a single correct response for each test question. Each test question is independent of other questions. A correct response to one question does not depend upon, or influence, the correct response to another. A person who is taking the test has up to 1 hour and 30 minutes to complete the test.”

According to my contact at the FAA, the recurrent test will have 40 questions.

Pilots will need to score a 70% or better to pass. To be eligible for the recurrent test you must be at least 16 years of age and hold a current Part 107 pilot certificate.

Testing centers will be the source of information on test cost. The FAA directs people to this link.

Contact Steve

About Steve Rhode

Steve is an experienced and certificated UAS pilot and aircraft instrument rated pilot. He is also the Chief Pilot with the Wake Forest Fire Department and North Carolina Public Safety Drone Academy.
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